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L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar: Current and future applications to Earth sciences

  1. We applied differential InSAR analysis to the Shiretoko Peninsula, northeastern Hokkaido, Japan. All the interferograms of long temporal baseline (~ 3 years) processed from SAR data of three L-band satellites ...

    Authors: Youichiro Takada and George Motono

    Citation: Earth, Planets and Space 2020 72:131

    Content type: Full paper

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  2. Interferograms pertaining to large earthquakes typically reveal the occurrence of elastic deformations caused by the earthquake along with several complex surface displacements. In this study, we identified di...

    Authors: Satoshi Fujiwara, Takayuki Nakano and Yu Morishita

    Citation: Earth, Planets and Space 2020 72:119

    Content type: Frontier letter

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  3. The cloud-free, wide-swath, day-and-night observation capability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has an important role in rapid landslide monitoring to reduce economic and human losses. Although interferomet...

    Authors: Masato Ohki, Takahiro Abe, Takeo Tadono and Masanobu Shimada

    Citation: Earth, Planets and Space 2020 72:67

    Content type: Full paper

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  4. Determining the fault parameters of an earthquake is fundamental for studying the earthquake physics, understanding the seismotectonics of the region, and forecasting future earthquake activities in the surrou...

    Authors: Nematollah Ghayournajarkar and Yo Fukushima

    Citation: Earth, Planets and Space 2020 72:64

    Content type: Full paper

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  5. Asama volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. Spatially dense surface deformation at Asama volcano has rarely been documented because of its high topography and snow cover around the summit. This...

    Authors: Xiaowen Wang, Yosuke Aoki and Jie Chen

    Citation: Earth, Planets and Space 2019 71:121

    Content type: Full paper

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  6. Active faults commonly repeat cycles of sudden rupture and subsequent silence of hundreds to tens of thousands of years, but some parts of mature faults exhibit continuous creep accompanied by many small earth...

    Authors: Yo Fukushima, Manabu Hashimoto, Masatoshi Miyazawa, Naoki Uchida and Taka’aki Taira

    Citation: Earth, Planets and Space 2019 71:118

    Content type: Full paper

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