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Rydberg atom quantum metrology

Guest Editors:
Dong-Sheng Ding: University of Science and Technology of China, China
Zong-Kai Liu: University of Science and Technology of China, China

Submission Status: Closed | Submission Deadline: Closed


This collection is no longer accepting submissions


EPJ Quantum Technology is calling for submissions to our Collection on Rydberg atom quantum metrology. This topical collection focuses on theories and technologies of Rydberg atom quantum metrology. In this collection, we invite authors to submit original research or review articles on Rydberg atom quantum metrology theories and technologies

Meet the Guest Editors

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Dong-Sheng Ding: University of Science and Technology of China, China

A professor at the University of Science and Technology of China. Dong-Sheng Ding has been engaged with light and atom interaction, and has published more than 90 SCI papers thus far. He has obtained a series of original works, including: quantum storage of single-photon carrying orbital angular momentum and entanglement storage; Raman storage of photonic entanglement; multi-degree of freedom entanglement quantum storage; observing self-organized criticality and criticality enhanced metrology in Rydberg atoms system; and deep learning enhanced Rydberg multi-frequency recognition.
 

Zong-Kai Liu: University of Science and Technology of China, China

Zong-Kai Liu is a Ph.D. candidate in Physics from Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, supervised by Prof. Dong-Sheng Ding. His research focuses on Rydberg sensor, many-body physics and deep learning and he has obtained a series of original works with Prof. Dong-Sheng Ding, including: observing self-organized criticality and criticality enhanced metrology in Rydberg atoms system; and deep learning enhanced Rydberg multi-frequency recognition. He has co-top-authored and first authored papers in prestigious journals including Nature Physics, and Nature Communications.
 

About the collection

The progress of human society is often accompanied by an increase in the ability to explore the unknown world, which depends on the sensors that people observe the world around them. As we know, humans have biosensors, such as eyes and ears, that can see distant objects and hear sounds. When telescopes and microscopes were found, people could see farther and smaller objects. The birth of quantum mechanics has enabled us to better understand the interaction of microscopic particles such as photons, electrons, and atoms. Using the special properties of microscopic particles, quantum technology can have more powerful capabilities than the corresponding classical information technology, such as: quantum systems can achieve quantum sensing that breaks through the limits of classical measurement, secure quantum communication, and parallel quantum computing. 

Among these fields, quantum sensors are devices that measure physical quantities using the quantum properties of microscopic particles. Due to the vulnerability of quantum states to environmental perturbations, one can use it to measure physical quantities in the environment and their changes, and its sensitivity can be much higher than that of traditional measurement systems. Quantum sensing is the frontier of the development of modern physics, and it has been highly concerned by various countries. People have also formulated and launched major research plans for the practical application of quantum sensing technology. This field has gradually moved from laboratory to practical applications. 

Quantum sensing technology based on neutral atoms or atom-like systems have been attracting attention because they utilize quantum systems where the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements can reach the quantum regime, for example atomic clock, atomic interferometer, atomic magnetometers, and etc. With the rapid development of quantum sensing, an atomic microwave receiver with Rydberg atom that could break through the traditional microwave measurement system in all aspects of performance has potential applications.  

Microwave electric field refers to electromagnetic waves with wavelengths between 1 mm and 1 m. Because of its better orientation and higher information capacity, it has vital applications in the fields of data communication, remote sensing, navigation, and etc. The traditional method to measure microwave electric field is based on an antenna, which has inherently frequency-dependent size and limited sensitivity due to electronic noise. As the Rydberg atom has a large electric dipole moment, it has a strong response to weak electric fields, so it is favored as a very promising microwave measurement system. The Rydberg atom has great advantages in measuring microwave electric fields, and it is expected to realize quantum microwave measurement methods that surpass traditional methods.

This topic collection focuses on theories and technologies of Rydberg atom quantum metrology. In this collection, we invite authors to submit original research or review articles on Rydberg atom quantum metrology theories and technologies. The editors are interested in articles which help to improve the performance of quantum metrology by Rydberg atom, and the promoted technologies in practical applications.

Topics include, but are not limited to: 

• Rydberg atom, 
• Microwave measurement, 
• Atomic antenna, 
• Quantum metrology, 
• THz imaging, 
• Atomic microwave receiver, 
• Microwave-to-Optics Conversion, 
• Enhanced Precision, 
• Atomic electrometry, 
• Atomic mixer

  1. We propose a Rydberg atom-based receiver for amplitude-modulation (AM) reception utilizing a dual-tone microwave field. The pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) signal is encoded in the basic microwave field (...

    Authors: Jinpeng Yuan, Ting Jin, Yang Yan, Liantuan Xiao, Suotang Jia and Lirong Wang
    Citation: EPJ Quantum Technology 2024 11:2
  2. We investigate the response bandwidth of a superheterodyne Rydberg receiver at a room-temperature vapor cell, and present an architecture of multi-channel lasers excitation to increase the response bandwidth a...

    Authors: Jinlian Hu, Yuechun Jiao, Yunhui He, Hao Zhang, Linjie Zhang, Jianming Zhao and Suotang Jia
    Citation: EPJ Quantum Technology 2023 10:51
  3. Measurement sensitivity is one of the critical indicators for Rydberg atomic radio receivers. This work quantitatively studies the relationship between the atomic superheterodyne receiver’s sensitivity and the...

    Authors: Peng Zhang, Mingyong Jing, Zheng Wang, Yan Peng, Shaoxin Yuan, Hao Zhang, Liantuan Xiao, Suotang Jia and Linjie Zhang
    Citation: EPJ Quantum Technology 2023 10:39
  4. A scheme for measuring microwave (MW) electric (E) fields is proposed based on bichromatic electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rydberg atoms. A bichromatic control field drives the excited state ...

    Authors: Mingzhi Han, He Hao, Xiaoyun Song, Zheng Yin, Michal Parniak, Zhengmao Jia and Yandong Peng
    Citation: EPJ Quantum Technology 2023 10:28
  5. Rydberg atom-based sensors using the atomic heterodyne technique demonstrate prominent performance on sensing sensitivity and thus have significant potential for radar, electronic reconnaissance, and communica...

    Authors: Kai Yang, Ruiqi Mao, Li He, Jiawei Yao, Jianbing Li, Zhanshan Sun and Yunqi Fu
    Citation: EPJ Quantum Technology 2023 10:23

Submission Guidelines

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This Collection welcomes submission of Research Articles. Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you have read our submission guidelines. Articles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select "Rydberg atom quantum metrology" from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the journal’s standard peer-review process and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Guest Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Guest Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.